Tag Archives: pulhamite

The Alpine Gardener – September 2012

120900 - Alpine Gardener - Sept 12 - Cover 400 x 600The Master Builders of Britain’s Rock Gardens

Rock Landscapes: The Pulham Legacy                              

Rock Gardens, Grottoes, Ferneries, Follies, Fountains and Garden Ornaments

Garden Art Press, 2012

ISBN  978 – 1 – 87067 – 376 – 1

Price   £35.00

AGS1 - Rock Landscapes Front Cover

 J.R.Pulham, Secretary to the Committee of the Alpine Garden Society at the end of World War Two, was the last of a dynasty of four James Pulhams who, in turn, led a company manufacturing garden ornaments and constructing rock gardens, water features and ferneries.   Continue reading

News Update – June ’13

A Miscellany of Trips  

The last few weeks have been very eventful, featuring a number of trips of one form or another, involving:

  • A visit to Preston, nr Canterbury, to look at a beautiful Pulham garden that, for some reason or another, managed to evade all the Pulham databases, so it can now be officially recorded for the first time.
  • A potentially disastrous trip on a trip to London.
  • A personal trip to a Pulhamite Celebration at Bawdsey Manor, Suffolk, and
  • A very successful trip at Shipton Court, Shipton-under-Wychwood, with the Oxfordshire Gardens Trust. Continue reading

01 – June 2011 – Leonardslee Gardens, Horsham, Sussex

1890  -  Leonardslee Gardens, Horsham, Sussex

Set in a tranquil woodland valley in West Sussex, the Leonardslee gardens are one of the largest and most spectacular in England. Continue reading

11 – April 2012 – Luton Hoo

1909-10  -  Luton Hoo, Luton, Bedfordshire

The grounds of Luton Hoo were originally laid out by ‘Capability’ Brown c1770, for John Stuart, the 3rd Earl of Bute, who was Prime Minister for a short period from 1762-63.   In 1903, Sir Julius Wernher – who made his fortune from the Kimberley diamond mines of South Africa [i] – bought the estate, and made many alterations and additions to the house and grounds. Continue reading

09 – February 2012 – Coombe Wood, Croydon, Surrey

1899  -  Coombe Wood, Croydon, Surrey

Coombe Estate, Croydon, Surrey, was purchased by Arthur Lloyd c1898.   He built a new 20-room mansion, and made a number of improvements to the existing gardens, including the construction of an ornamental rock garden, complete with a pool and waterfall, which carry all the hallmarks of a Pulham creation.    Continue reading

06 – November 2011 – Titsey Place, Oxted

1871 - ‘Titsey Place’, Oxted, Surrey

Granville W.G. Leveson Gower – an amateur historian, archaeologist and antiquarian – inherited ‘Titsey Place’, near Oxted, Surrey, during the late 19th century, and laid out the framework of the gardens, ‘joining the lakes together, and giving the lakes more of a “naturalistic” shape.’ [i]   The lakes are fed from a chalybeate spring that bubbles up from under a rock in the middle of the gardens, and flows through a stream into the top lake, and then tumbles over a waterfall, under a stone bridge, and into the lower lake.  Continue reading

05 – October 2011 – St James’s Park, London

1895-99  -  St James’s Park, London

One of Pulhams’ smaller works in public parks during the 1890s was in St James’s Park, London.   The land here used to be a swamp, subject to flooding from the Tyburn stream, which still flows through the lake.   Henry VIII acquired it in 1532, and enclosed it for the hunt.   It became a fashionable promenade for London’s high society in the 18th century and, in 1838, it was completely re-designed by John Nash in the English landscaping style that he had learned through his association with Humphry Repton. Continue reading

04 – September 2011 – Bedwell Park, Hertfordshire

1866 - Bedwell Park, Essendon, Hertfordshire

Bedwell Park was the home of Robert Hanbury, son of Robert Hanbury Snr, who was a Senior Partner in the firm of Truman, Hanbury and Buxton, one the leading brewing firms in London.   Robert Snr lived at Poles Park – a few miles away near Ware – where James Pulham and Son had worked in 1865.   Shortly before his early death (at the age of 44) in 1867, Robert Jnr commissioned James 2 to construct a: Continue reading

03 – August 2011 – Sunningdale Park

1898-99 – Sunningdale Park, Ascot, Berkshire

Sunningdale Park is situated in what once used to be part of Windsor Great Park, and still contains a Spanish Chestnut tree – with a girth in excess of twenty feet! – that dates back to the time of Henry VIII.   James Wyatt built the first house at Sunningdale in 1785, and, over the years, this was rebuilt and enlarged by its successive owners until Major William James Joicey - of the Northern mining family – bought it in 1890. Continue reading